Friday, October 24, 2014

NEW RELEASE: A Place Halfway by K.C. Finn (Save $1 today only!)

NEW RELEASE TODAY: A Place Halfway by K.C. Finn

We are excited to share this brand-new release of A Place Halfway by K.C. Finn! Read below to find out more about A Place Halfway and make sure to get your copy today before the price goes back up to $4.99! Currently on sale for $3.99. 



A struggling psychic girl steps out into the big, wide world amidst the murky depths of racial segregation in England, 1961.

As a teenage psychic, Josephine Fontaine knows what it’s like to be different. At Peregrine Place, a school full of youngsters with gifts just like hers, sixteen-year-old Josie is growing tired of her life and looking for excitement beyond the grand manor house’s walls. When an opportunity arises to work in a local music bar, she jumps at the chance, learning to balance her new job with the pressures of studying the ways of the Synsk.

There she meets the charming Tommy Asher, a fellow psychic with a talent for music, and Jake Bolton, a handsome, surly stranger with coffee-coloured skin. Throw in the return of her old crush Dai Bickerstaff, and Josie finds herself embroiled in a drama much bigger than she could have imagined, especially when certain parties take issue to her developing a friendship with a boy who isn’t white-skinned. When a mysterious record mogul offers Josie help to improve her psychic gifts, her world turns totally upside down, and she begins to question everything she thought she knew about the world, her family, and even herself.

Coming of age was never so intense as it will be for Josie in the winter of 1961.

CHECK OUT THIS BEST-SELLING SERIES:

All books in this series can be read as stand alone books. They do not need to be read in order. 

FREE BOOK: The Mind's Eye by K.C. Finn

A girl with a telepathic gift finds a boy clinging to his last hope during the war-torn climate of Europe, 1940.


At fifteen, Kit Cavendish is one the oldest evacuees to escape London at the start of the Second World War due to a long term illness that sees her stuck in a wheelchair most of the time. But Kit has an extraordinary psychic power: she can put herself into the minds of others, see through their eyes, feel their emotions, even talk to them – though she dares not speak out for fear of her secret ability being exposed.



As Kit settles into her new life in the North Wales village of Bryn Eira Bach, solitude and curiosity encourage her to gain better control of her gift. Until one day her search for information on the developing war leads her to the mind of Henri, a seventeen-year-old Norwegian boy witnessing the German occupation of his beloved city, Oslo. As Henri discovers more about the English girl occupying his mind, the psychic and emotional bonds between them strengthen and Kit guides him through an oppressive and dangerous time. 



There are secrets to be uncovered, both at home and abroad, and it’s up to Kit and Henri to come together and fight their own battles in the depths of the world’s greatest war.


Leighton's Summer by K.C. Finn

A teenage boy with something to prove gets caught up in a web of crime and deceit in England, 1945.

In the weeks leading up to his sixteenth birthday, gifted psychic Leighton Cavendish finds himself suddenly packed off to Blackpool, a glittering teenage paradise filled with plenty of opportunities for amusement—and trouble—to ensue. With only a preoccupied grandmother to keep an eye on him, Leighton’s desperation for adventure leads him out into a world of holidaymakers, candy and carnival rides—the ideal place to spend six weeks away from home.

But Leighton’s psychic visions are encroaching on his fun, trying to warn him of the danger that lurks beyond the shimmering lights of the Golden Mile. Who are the mysterious thieves Leighton sees in his head and what do they want with the children they seek? A girl called Faye holds the answer, but she has enough problems of her own. 

Amid the climate of a tourist town recovering from the impact of the Second World War, two lost teenagers will discover a shocking truth about human greed and together they will try to fight against it. For Leighton and Faye this will be a summer to remember—a summer filled with challenges that must be overcome.

A summer that turns a boy into a man. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Born in South Wales to Raymond and Jennifer Finn, Kimberley Charlotte Elisabeth Finn (known to readers as K.C., otherwise it'd be too much of a mouthful) was one of those corny little kids who always wanted to be a writer. She was also incredibly stubborn, and so has finally achieved that dream in 2013 with the release of her first three novellas in the four-part Caecilius Rex saga, the time travel adventure The Secret Star and her new urban fantasy epic The Book Of Shade.



As a sufferer with the medical condition M.E./C.F.S., Kim works part time as a private tutor and a teacher of creative writing, devoting the remainder of her time to writing novels and studying for an MA in Education and Linguistics.



K.C. Finn signed with Clean Teen Publishing in late 2013. Her books The Mind's Eye and Leighton's Summer were released in early 2014.




Want to READ MORE from Clean Teen Publishing? 

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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

MISS CONGENIALITY— A post on lessons learned by Sherry D. Ficklin (+ Check out the giveaway!)

MISS CONGENIALITY

A post on bullying and lessons learned by Sherry D. Ficklin.

Today my wonderful assistant Amanda posted this over on my Facebook page. She makes these for me all the time and they are always great. This one in particular reminded me of something that I would like to share with you.

When I was a pre-teen I was bullied something fierce. I was gangly, rail skinny, bony, and awkward. Even if I had been pretty and perfect, odds are someone would still have picked on me. Kids are a-holes like that and will pick on and bully others for any conceivable reason. They made fun of my name (Sherry Ash at the time, yeah, you can probably see where that went) they picked on my knobby knees and flat chest, they made fun of my second hand clothes and sometimes even my nice new clothes. I developed a paralyzing fear of public speaking by about age 9. All I wanted was to blend into the background and not be seen. Then when I was 12 years old I met a girl who became my best friend. Marcia. She was ballsy and brave and helped me not be afraid to be seen. But still the fear of public speaking remained. 

My mother, in true southern style, decided the best way to get me past it was by throwing me to the sharks, metaphorically speaking. She started enrolling me in beauty pageants. See somewhere along the way I had blossomed and wasn't (as much) the gangly little girl I'd been. I was no super model, to be sure, but I wasn't hideous either, despite what some people called me. And at the end of the day, it really did help. It sounds counter to everything popular culture tells us about these kind of pageants but my mom was a super hero. She never pushed, never got upset or too wrapped up in the competition. She wanted me to have fun. And so I did. 
 
I lost a lot and won a couple. But none of that really stayed with me. I not only got over my fear of speaking, but I thrived. I allowed myself to be, do, and act however I wanted because after being judged by the way my (substantial) butt looked in a bathing suit, everything else was easy. I learned to speak in front of crowds big and small, I learned to answer questions on the fly and to always have a witty retort to get a laugh (something that still helps to this day). 

There was one pageant that stands out in my mind, however. I had been cut from the top five, which meant my day was over. I'd been in too high of heels and a heavy sequin dress for the better part of eight hours which is WAY more taxing than it sounds. I wanted nothing more than to wash my face and go get a double cheeseburger and a milkshake (my mom's post pageant celebration food). But the coordinator refused to let me leave. All the other girls were packing up, but she made me stay, in full dress, so I could "talk to her after". 

I hadn't done anything wrong, but I was tired and grouchy and I wanted to go home. So for the first time in my life (I was 15-16 at the time) I had a hissy fit. I mean a full on diva tantrum. Like, it could have been on reality tv. It was like one of those Snickers commercials, "You're a dick when you're
hungry" type situations. 
The coordinator was done with me. She put down her headset and shoved a plaque into my hands. 

It read Miss Congeniality. 

My fellow contestants had voted me the nicest girl at the pageant and here I was acting like a total douche-canoe. I cried. I cried harder than I'd ever cried when I won because I realized that somewhere along the way I'd forgotten what the point was. To this day the only trophy I have of those years is that plaque. It reminds me to be kind, even when I'm feeling upset, it reminds me that while it's nice to win, it's better to play nice, to show love and compassion for the people around you. Because you won't remember how many times you lost or even how many times you won. What stays with you are the moments when you get a quiet nod of appreciation from the people whose lives you made a little better. 

I'm far from perfect. But I'm working on it. We all are. We all have our struggles. I'm here to tell you that a little understanding, a little kindness, goes a really long way. 

And a quick note for all the people out there who have been picked on or bullied, I will say that it really does get better. Just last year I was writing my 6th YA novel and I dedicated it to all the haters. There's nothing quite as cathartic as finally being able to look at the people who mistreated us and give them a resounding F-you. 



ABOUT SHERRY D. FICKLIN



Sherry D. Ficklin is a full time writer from Colorado where she lives with her husband, four kids, two dogs, and a fluctuating number of chickens and house guests. A former military brat, she loves to travel and meet new people. She can often be found browsing her local bookstore with a large white hot chocolate in one hand and a towering stack of books in the other. That is, unless she’s on deadline at which time she, like the Loch Ness monster, is only seen in blurry photographs.

She is the author of The Gods of Fate Trilogy now available from Dragonfly Publishing. Her previously self-published novel After Burn: Military Brats has been acquired by Harlequin and will be released in 2015 with a second book in that series to follow. Her newest YA steampunk novel, EXTRACTED: The Lost Imperials book 1, co-written with Tyler H. Jolley is now available everywhere books are sold and her newest YA novel, Losing Logan, is due for release in 2014 from Clean Teen Publishing.


 



SHERRY D. FICKLIN'S BOOKS:




GIVEAWAY:

Before you enter this giveaway, let's add an extra 5 entries to this Rafflecopter today for just saying something nice to someone! Easy right? All you have to do is say something nice to someone to encourage them today. It can be a compliment, a few words of appreciation or whatever you think will bring a smile to their face. While it's not a requirement, we encourage you to look for someone who may need those extra words of encouragement today. Maybe it's someone going through a tough time or someone you don't normally speak to. You can write an encouraging post on their Facebook wall, Tweet them a message, send them a text, call them or tell them in person. It's up to you. We would even dare you to take this a step forward and do this every day. Make it a habit and make a difference. 


Please remember that we will have additional entry options for this giveaway with each new blog post we send! So make sure to subscribe to follow our blog by email to maximize your chances to win some amazing prizes that include a GRAND PRIZE: $100 Amazon Gift Card or Paypal Cash

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

To Anyone Who's Been Bullied… A virtual gift from Author Lauren Nicolle Taylor.

TO ANYONE WHO'S BEEN BULLIED…

A virtual gift from Author Lauren Nicolle Taylor.

Vocals, Videography and Art Done by Lauren Nicolle Taylor. 


YOU ARE NOT ALONE! YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL JUST THE WAY YOU ARE! 

ADDITIONAL GIVEAWAY:

Hop over to our Clean Teen Publishing Facebook Page and tag the friends that you think are beautiful on our Beautiful post! (See our Facebook Page for details.) A random winner will receive this picture (autographed), as well as digital copies of all of Lauren Nicolle Taylor's books! 

ABOUT LAUREN NICOLLE TAYLOR:


Lauren Nicolle Taylor is a 33-year-old mother living in the tiny, lush town of Bridgewater on the other side of the world in Australia. She married her high school sweetheart and has three very boisterous and individual children. She earned a Bachelors degree in Health Sciences with Honours in Obstetrics and Gynecology and majored in Psychology while minoring in Contemporary Australian Writing.

After a disastrous attempt to build her dream house that left her family homeless, She found herself inexplicably drawn to the computer. She started writing, not really knowing where it may lead but ended up, eight weeks later, with the rough draft of The Woodlands.

In 2013, Lauren Nicolle Taylor accepted a publishing contract with Clean Teen Publishing. Her first published novel, The Woodlands, was released on August 30, 2013 and followed shortly by The Wall and The Wounded. The Wanted—the stunning conclusion to the series— is scheduled for release in October of 2014. 

Where to find Lauren: Blog / Facebook / Twitter


LAUREN'S BOOKS:


GIVEAWAY:


Please remember that we will have additional entry options for this giveaway with each new blog post we send! So make sure to subscribe to follow our blog by email to maximize your chances to win some amazing prizes that include a GRAND PRIZE: $100 Amazon Gift Card or Paypal Cash

Monday, October 20, 2014

Bullying Then and Now (A look back with N.W. Harris.) Plus, enter our giveaway!

BULLYING THEN AND NOW

(A look back with N.W. Harris.) 

If you met me, you’d probably never guess I was the type to get bullied in school. I’m five-feet-ten-inches tall, I take martial arts, I’m extremely fit, and just don’t generally look like the stereotypical person who’d get bullied. But, I was very small as a boy—second smallest in my grade for much of the time I was in school. My junior year of high school I weighed ninety-eight pounds soaking wet. So you see, back then, I was an ideal target for bullies. 

I was raised in a small town in North Georgia—much like the fictional Leeville in my book, The Last Orphans. I grew up during a time when kids got the belt for being bad at home and got the wooden paddle for being bad at school. To put it simply, it was a more violent time for children back then. I got paddled at school a few times when I was growing up, once for selling stink bombs to other kids—little glass vials my friend ordered out of the back of a comic books that would clear the hallways when broken on the floor. They smelled like a cross between a skunk and a rotten egg. Good times those, even if I did get my hide tanned for them. 

Bullying was commonplace in my school, and it wasn’t really labeled or regulated. I don’t ever remember being bullied by my own classmates—it was usually the older kids we had to worry about. For example, in the first grade, I remember three big girls, probably second or third graders, who would wait for me on the playground and beat the crap out of me on a daily basis. I don’t remember the teachers coming to the rescue, and, embarrassed at being beaten up by girls, I never told my dad. In my mind, it was just the way things were. I just had to endure it, living in fear of recess. 

I’ll admit, some of the bullying I endured was because I was a bit too cocky for my own good. Each morning, I’d walk down our mile-long driveway to the bus stop. The school bus ride took over an hour and was on some fairly rough dirt roads that kept the driver’s attention off of us kids and on the windshield. I could’ve sat near the front of the bus and been bothered a lot less—but no, not me! Everyday, I would march my scrawny butt to the back of the bus, where two large boys, who were at least five years older than me and twice my size and strength, sat. They ruled the back of the bus, saying that no kids younger than them could sit there, and no one could sit in their seats. The two massive bullies chewed tobacco and sat on the last bench seats on either side, sprawling out so no one could join them. 

Each day, I tried to erase any sign of fear or intimidation from my expression, took a deep breath, and climbed the steps onto the school bus. I’d walk straight toward the back with my tiny chest sticking out, determined to protest their rule of the back of the bus. As far as I was concerned, they had no right to those seats and they could share. What was I thinking? Not sure. I guess I’m just one of those people that is willing to bleed for what I believe in, and whose willing to be made a martyr if that’s what’s required to make my point. Anyways, I’d be walking to the back of the bus and they’d be looking at me, smiling wickedly. Their expressions always said the same thing, “Really, this kid is coming back for more!” 

The routine was the same each day. I’d sit down, and they’d say, “These seats are for older kids.” I’d object and they’d tell me that I couldn’t sit there unless I busted knuckles with them. So I would. Busting knuckles meant I had to make a fist and they’d punch my fist as hard as they could for much of the bus ride to school. I endured this abuse, refusing to relinquish my seat. My fists were always swollen and purple, and I’d hide them from my father—though to this day I’m not sure why. I never sought out help and approached that daily ride with fear. My ego and my sense of what was right wouldn’t allow me to back down, and on more than one occasion, the abuse was much worse than just busted knuckles. 

When my classmates and I made it to the ninth grade, we knew we’d be bullied by the upper classmen. It was just the way it was. I walked into Pickens High School for the first time with the horror stories my older brother had told me swirling in my head. No ninth grade boy survived the year without getting stuffed in a trashcan. I remember that horrible day when four big boys caught me in the gymnasium bathroom. I fought like a wolverine, scratching, punching and biting at them. They laughed and grappled me to the wet floor. They lifted me and shoved me headfirst into that dirty trashcan, though to my credit, they gave up after only getting me about halfway in. 

I have two children now, a boy and a girl. My son is much like me, on the smaller side, and he looks a few years younger than he actually is. I’m so glad the world has changed! I would not stand for him being abused like I was, not for a second. It’s important that we keep the bullying issue in the forefront of our minds. Kids shouldn’t be afraid to ride the school bus or to go to school. It is also important for parents and teachers to be aware that some kids will endure bullying and never complain about it. It is our responsibility as adults to protect the children, and know what is going on in their lives. They are so precious, they are our future, and they deserve to grow up happy and not live in a constant state of fear.

ABOUT N.W. HARRIS:


Born at the end of the Vietnam war and raised on a horse farm near small town north Georgia, N.W. Harris's imagination evolved under the swaying pines surrounding his family’s log home. On summer days that were too hot, winter days that were too cold, and every night into the wee morning hours, he read books.

N.W. Harris published his first novel—Joshua's Tree—in 2013. It was no wonder that with his wild imagination and passion for all things word related, that N.W. Harris was named a quarterfinalist in Amazon's Break Through Novel Award Contest. In early 2014, N.W. Harris joined the ranks with Clean Teen Publishing when they signed his new young adult apocalyptic adventure series—The Last Orphans. 

In addition to writing, N.W. Harris has been a submarine sailor, nurse, and business owner. His studies have included biology, anthropology, and medicine at UCSB and SUNY Buffalo. He is an active member of SCBWI and lives in sunny southern California with his beautiful wife and two perfect children. He writes like he reads, constantly.

 

CHECK OUT THE LAST ORPHANS! 


GIVEAWAY:

Before you enter this giveaway, let's add an extra 5 entries to this Rafflecopter today for just saying something nice to someone! Easy right? All you have to do is say something nice to someone to encourage them today. It can be a compliment, a few words of appreciation or whatever you think will bring a smile to their face. While it's not a requirement, we encourage you to look for someone who may need those extra words of encouragement today. Maybe it's someone going through a tough time or someone you don't normally speak to. You can write an encouraging post on their Facebook wall, Tweet them a message, send them a text, call them or tell them in person. It's up to you. We would even dare you to take this a step forward and do this every day. Make it a habit and make a difference. 


Please remember that we will have additional entry options for this giveaway with each new blog post we send! So make sure to subscribe to follow our blog by email to maximize your chances to win some amazing prizes that include a GRAND PRIZE: $100 Amazon Gift Card or Paypal Cash

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Every Story Needs a Villain (Thoughts on Bullying by K.C. Finn)

Every Story Needs A Villain

Thoughts on Bullying by K.C. Finn

The Anti-Bullying movement is a campaign which rises up in different shapes and forms all over the world, with one common intention: to raise awareness of bullying in all walks of life, and to encourage its prevention wherever possible. Those last two words – wherever possible –mean a lot to me in particular, and they form the basis of the issue I’d like to talk about today.

Physical violence in schools, colleges, the workplace and any other area of life is just plain wrong. If you see someone being physically bullied, you should always do whatever’s within your power to make it stop, whether that’s calling for the nearest authority, or stepping in yourself if you happen to be an educator or another enforcer of safety codes. Nobody should have to live with constant physical violence in their lives.

Emotional bullying, in the form of the spoken or written word, however, is quite another matter. This style of bullying is far more common than physical attacks, and it affects everyone at some time in their lives. Short of taping everybody’s mouths up in the classroom, there isn’t much you can do about someone who insists on saying hurtful things. You can punish them, certainly, but I’m sure those of you with first-hand experience of bullying know that a punishment rarely stops the bully from resuming their taunts the very next day. There is a simple, biological explanation for this inevitability:

People evolve at different rates.

Everyone on this planet is an individual. At different speeds and via different means, most of us eventually learn that our words and actions, however small, have consequences for the people around us. Bullies who use harsh words to get a rise out of you have not yet evolved to understand how much those words will hurt you. No amount of intervention or punishment can speed up the biological empathy that just doesn’t exist in their brains yet. They are not as mature as you are. They can’t see the world the way that their victims do.

You may think that this presents a fairly hopeless perspective, since there’s nothing that can really be done about the jerk who calls you names from the back of the class. This is exactly how I felt when I was a bullied child, and later, a bullied adult in my college years. During that time, however, I discovered a perspective that changed everything. In my love of literature, I began to think about villains.
A villain’s purpose in a story is not just to cause trouble. Villains are essential in literature, because they present challenges to the hero. Their unstoppably wicked ways make the hero of the tale stand up for themselves. They force that hero to become stronger, braver and less afraid in the face of terrible adversity. Heroes become who they are because of the things they have overcome in their lives. Stories need villains, for without them, there would be no heroes at all.

Preventing bullying is not always possible. The less evolved amongst us will always seek to throw hate and humiliation our way. But that doesn’t mean we have to let that hate into our lives. We can use it to better ourselves if we approach it in the right way. Villains are sent to test you, so be ready for their challenges. Smile at their stupidity. Shine above their darkness. Show them that their small role in your life is to make you stronger, and greater than them. Pity them, because one day they’ll regret who they are right now.

Every day that you can overcome what your villains throw at you, you become an ever greater hero in your life’s story. When I look back on the villains who have passed through my life, I can take pride in the fact that I got past them, and they never stopped me from believing in myself, or from achieving my dreams. Celebrate your villains today, because they are the ones who will give you a stronger tomorrow.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Born in South Wales to Raymond and Jennifer Finn, Kimberley Charlotte Elisabeth Finn (known to readers as K.C., otherwise it'd be too much of a mouthful) was one of those corny little kids who always wanted to be a writer. She was also incredibly stubborn, and so has finally achieved that dream in 2013 with the release of her first three novellas in the four-part Caecilius Rex saga, the time travel adventure The Secret Star and her new urban fantasy epic The Book Of Shade.


As a sufferer with the medical condition M.E./C.F.S., Kim works part time as a private tutor and a teacher of creative writing, devoting the remainder of her time to writing novels and studying for an MA in Education and Linguistics.

K.C. Finn signed with Clean Teen Publishing in late 2013. Her books The Mind's Eye and Leighton's Summer were released in early 2014.



K.C. FINN'S BOOKS:

GIVEAWAY:

Before you enter this giveaway, let's add an extra 5 entries to this Rafflecopter today for just saying something nice to someone! Easy right? All you have to do is say something nice to someone to encourage them today. It can be a compliment, a few words of appreciation or whatever you think will bring a smile to their face. While it's not a requirement, we encourage you to look for someone who may need those extra words of encouragement today. Maybe it's someone going through a tough time or someone you don't normally speak to. You can write an encouraging post on their Facebook wall, Tweet them a message, send them a text, call them or tell them in person. It's up to you. We would even dare you to take this a step forward and do this every day. Make it a habit and make a difference. 


Please remember that we will have additional entry options for this giveaway with each new blog post we send! So make sure to subscribe to follow our blog by email to maximize your chances to win some amazing prizes that include a GRAND PRIZE: $100 Amazon Gift Card or Paypal Cash.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

The Biggest Bully is Never One Person by Gabrielle Arrowsmith (Plus, $300 in prizes giveaway!)

The Biggest Bully is Never One Person 

(A post by Gabrielle Arrowsmith.)

When you visualize bullying in schools, what image comes to mind? Someone who bullied you, a friend, or a classmate? The big, powerful character from a film or television show who famously stole lunch money from, vandalized the lockers of, and generally pushed around the small, ‘nerdy’ students? 


Today, the faces of both the bullies and their victims have changed, as have the avenues by which bullying takes place.  All this considered, bullying has the potential to be a runaway problem. 

 
From a teacher’s standpoint, I am proud to say that school districts have made bullying a primary concern, and have developed actions plans both to prevent and address situations where the bully or bullies and the victim or victims can be identified. 


Earlier this school year, a very upset fourth grade student approached me with a bullying concern. Unfortunately, there was no isolated incident or individual bully to point out. He expressed that he has suffered bullying since starting at the elementary school, and that everyone in the grade level participates in it (or does not stand up to break the cycle). 

I asked the boy to give examples to explain his history of being bullied, so that I could better understand how to address the issue. He told me that kids grumble when he’s put into a group with them, that they call him names like weird, gross, and dumb, and that people don’t sit by him at lunch, recess, or on the bus, and in fact move away from him if he makes an effort to join his peers. 

This type of bullying breaks my heart the most, because the victim feels they have no option for friendship with their peers, and can only seek solace from adults. It is also the most difficult to stop. How do you address an entire grade level in a meaningful way? Sure, there are videos, anti-bullying assemblies, blue T-shirt day, and wristbands that raise awareness and invite students to reflect on their school environment, but do these efforts have a long-term effect? 


My opinion is that, sadly, they do not—at least, not as much as school personnel and the students who feel massively victimized would like. But, these school-wide efforts and opportunities provided for bullied students to speak to a school counselor or attend friendship club during lunch and let the student know that they have advocates in their corner. Just as important as reiterating the fact that they are not weird, gross, or dumb, is the fact that they are not forgotten, and never alone.

About Gabrielle Arrowsmith:


GABRIELLE ARROWSMITH enjoyed writing her debut novel, Concealed in the Shadows, during a lovely Minnesota summer that she had off from her primary profession, teaching. Acting, playing and coaching soccer, reading, playing piano, and spending time with family and friends are among her other interests.

GABRIELLE ARROWSMITH'S BOOKS:

 

GIVEAWAY:

Before you enter this giveaway, let's add an extra 5 entries to this Rafflecopter today for just saying something nice to someone! Easy right? All you have to do is say something nice to someone to encourage them today. It can be a compliment, a few words of appreciation or whatever you think will bring a smile to their face. While it's not a requirement, we encourage you to look for someone who may need those extra words of encouragement today. Maybe it's someone going through a tough time or someone you don't normally speak to. You can write an encouraging post on their Facebook wall, Tweet them a message, send them a text, call them or tell them in person. It's up to you. We would even dare you to take this a step forward and do this every day. Make it a habit and make a difference. 


Please remember that we will have additional entry options for this giveaway with each new blog post we send! So make sure to subscribe to follow our blog by email to maximize your chances to win some amazing prizes that include a GRAND PRIZE: $100 Amazon Gift Card or Paypal Cash